Logan 18 WVU

16th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Science is Beauty with 658 notes

scienceisbeauty:

Learning maths concepts using gifs.

Via Functionspace

13th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Sometimes I Talk Too Much with 712 notes

destinycalling07:

Rahn, Müller, Brehme, Götze

Source: destinycalling07

13th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Sometimes I Talk Too Much with 712 notes

destinycalling07:

Rahn, Müller, Brehme, Götze

Source: destinycalling07

12th September 2014

Photo reblogged from A Momentary Flow with 179 notes

laboratoryequipment:

Researchers Capture Sound of an AtomResearchers at Chalmers Univ. of Technology have shown the use of sound to communicate with an artificial atom. They can thereby demonstrate phenomena from quantum physics with sound taking on the role of light. The results will be published in the journal Science.The interaction between atoms and light is well known and has been studied extensively in the field of quantum optics. However, to achieve the same kind of interaction with sound waves has been a more challenging undertaking. The Chalmers researchers have now succeeded in making acoustic waves couple to an artificial atom. The study was done in collaboration between experimental and theoretical physicists.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/researchers-capture-sound-atom

laboratoryequipment:

Researchers Capture Sound of an Atom

Researchers at Chalmers Univ. of Technology have shown the use of sound to communicate with an artificial atom. They can thereby demonstrate phenomena from quantum physics with sound taking on the role of light. The results will be published in the journal Science.

The interaction between atoms and light is well known and has been studied extensively in the field of quantum optics. However, to achieve the same kind of interaction with sound waves has been a more challenging undertaking. The Chalmers researchers have now succeeded in making acoustic waves couple to an artificial atom. The study was done in collaboration between experimental and theoretical physicists.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/researchers-capture-sound-atom

Source: laboratoryequipment

8th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from a bit of escapism is in order, wouldn't you say? with 521,236 notes

justplaying-thegame:

94612:

sushinfood:

vvankinq:

this is fucked up. this fucked me up. the teachers fucked up by not showing us this fuck up. fuck.

dear god

i’m 28 and never knew this

fuck the system 

what’s the point though? are you gonna sit there during a test doing this?

Source: yodiscrepo

27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Δ S > 0 with 1,130 notes

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Moiré pattern, in physics, is the geometrical design that results when a set of straight or curved lines is superposed onto another set.

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Moiré pattern, in physics, is the geometrical design that results when a set of straight or curved lines is superposed onto another set.

Source: trigonometry-is-my-bitch

25th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Mind Blowing Science! with 62 notes

mindblowingscience:

Scientists manipulate magnetically levitated objects

Researchers from Harvard University have discovered how to orientate small objects in any direction using magnetic levitation.
Methods to manipulate small objects are crucial to manufacture complex structures such as electronic components in assembly lines.
But few methods exist that deal with fragile and arbitrarily shaped objects.
The researchers rotated delicate objects of varied shapes and sizes without “touching” them.
The results of their experiments are published in PNAS journal.
Lead author, Dr Anand Bala Subramaniam, from Harvard’s Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology told, BBC News: “Magnetic levitation in liquids has been used before to separate materials based on their density, but never to manipulate objects.”

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Scientists manipulate magnetically levitated objects

Researchers from Harvard University have discovered how to orientate small objects in any direction using magnetic levitation.

Methods to manipulate small objects are crucial to manufacture complex structures such as electronic components in assembly lines.

But few methods exist that deal with fragile and arbitrarily shaped objects.

The researchers rotated delicate objects of varied shapes and sizes without “touching” them.

The results of their experiments are published in PNAS journal.

Lead author, Dr Anand Bala Subramaniam, from Harvard’s Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology told, BBC News: “Magnetic levitation in liquids has been used before to separate materials based on their density, but never to manipulate objects.”

Continue Reading.

24th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Mind Blowing Science! with 376 notes

mindblowingscience:

Implant means end of reading glasses is in sight


Reading glasses could be banished for ever after scientists developed a technique to reverse vision problems in ageing eyes.


As some people age, their ability to switch focus between near and distant objects diminishes, a condition known as presbyopia.


It can skew the perception of depth and makes reading in poor light impossible.


Now scientists have developed a tiny implant, no bigger than a pinhead, which sits inside the cornea and slightly increases its curvature, to allow the eye to focus again.


Known as a Raindrop corneal inlay, the technique was invented in America but the first operations have now been carried out at a clinic in Leamington Spa, Warwickshire.



Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Implant means end of reading glasses is in sight

Reading glasses could be banished for ever after scientists developed a technique to reverse vision problems in ageing eyes.

As some people age, their ability to switch focus between near and distant objects diminishes, a condition known as presbyopia.

It can skew the perception of depth and makes reading in poor light impossible.

Now scientists have developed a tiny implant, no bigger than a pinhead, which sits inside the cornea and slightly increases its curvature, to allow the eye to focus again.

Known as a Raindrop corneal inlay, the technique was invented in America but the first operations have now been carried out at a clinic in Leamington Spa, Warwickshire.

20th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Good Graces, Bad Influence with 56,924 notes

x

Source: matafari

20th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from BaierHugs with 30,191 notes

Source: deadlykillerqueen